The Qualities of a Knight, Part 1

Courtesy – to a knight, courtesy involves more than merely following rules of etiquette. It is
also an attitude, a way of presenting himself to the world. A knight carries himself proudly, maintains self-control, and accepts ill- mannered behavior with grace. He follows social customs to the best of his ability. He is polite and deferential to friends and strangers alike.

A Knight considers the feelings of others and takes care not to offend them. etc. Always demonstrates proper manners (shaking hands with friends, expressing gratitude for favors) and keeps himself immaculately groomed (bathing regularly and wearing clean clothes, Speaks tactfully and kindly. A Knight never knowingly insults or slanders another person, even his greatest enemy. If others engage in insults or slander, the Knight walks away.

Behave with dignity. A knight refrains from emotional outbursts, excessive eating and drinking, foul language, and other boorish acts.(Not saying a knight can’t drink, many of Arthur’s knights did drink, but they seldom ever let themselves get belligerent or boorish.)

Honesty – A knight always tells the truth as he knows it. He may decline or withhold
information, but will never intentionally mislead anyone, even his or her enemies. A knight may ask permission not to answer a direct question, but if pressed will tell the truth (However, he may frame his answer so as not to reveal vital information).

A Knight doesn’t make promises lightly, but once he gives his word, he always keeps it. As a marriage vow is a promise, a Knight cannot consider a divorce. The only exceptions to this is if the spouse commits an evil deed, abandonment, and the like, then the Knight can divorce.

Valor – A knight demonstrates unyielding courage in the face of adversity. No danger is
too great to prevent him from fulfilling a promise or completing a mission. His commitment is stronger than his fear of pain, hardship or even death. A Knight’s valor is particularly evident on the battlefield. He regards war as a noble enterprise and combat as an opportunity to glorify his patron.

Honor – A Knight conducts himself with integrity regardless of circumstance. He behaves in a morally sound manner even when he’s by himself or when no one else will know of
his actions. It is an admirable act to comfort a dying friend, but an act of honor to comfort a dying enemy.

The Knight shows mercy to the repentant, and refuses to inflict undue suffering, even on the vilest evildoer. Accepts all challenges to duel of fight given by those of comparable status and power. A challenge from an arrogant youngster or a drunken warrior may go unheeded.

He dies before compromising his principles, betraying his liege or faith, or abandoning a protected charge. A Knights defends the weak. Obeys all just orders from his superiors without hesitation or question. An order that is considered unjust, (disobeys the will of the patron) may be challenged or disobeyed.

Generosity – A Knight gladly shares his funds and possessions with anyone in need. He will give his last bit of food to a hungry person, even if he must go without food. If he encounters a soldier without a sword, and the knight owns two, he will give one away as a gift, regardless of the sword’s value.

He is generous of spirit, always willing to lend an ear to a troubled companion or acknowledge a friend’s accomplishments with lavish praise.

* * * * *

This blog is still in the ‘providing information’ stage.  Part 2 of the Qualities of a Knight will cover some of the same qualities I’ve already mentioned above, but will be more open (I hope) to interpretation, discussion, expounding on the information (or lack of), etc.

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